Cairo by bus guided group tour, Pyramids, Egyptian Museum,Lunch and Shopping

20 hr

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Group Tour

Discover the beauties of Cairo and all it has to offer in this amazing must do trip. Guided group tour includes entrance to Egyptian Museum, Giza Pyramid area , Lunch and a visit to either a perfumery or a papayrus workshop.
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Itinerary Details

Itinerary
This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Pyramids of Giza, Al Haram Str., Giza 12611 Egypt

The last remaining wonder of the ancient world; for nearly 4000 years, the extraordinary shape, impeccable geometry and sheer bulk of the Giza Pyramids have invited the obvious questions: ‘How were we built, and why?’. Centuries of research have given us parts of the answer. Built as massive tombs on the orders of the pharaohs, they were constructed by teams of workers tens-of-thousands strong. Today they stand as an awe-inspiring tribute to the might, organisation and achievements of ancient Egypt.

Ongoing excavations on the Giza Plateau, along with the discovery of a pyramid-builders' settlement, complete with areas for large-scale food production and medical facilities, have provided more evidence that the workers were not the slaves of Hollywood tradition, but an organised workforce of Egyptian farmers. During the flood season, when...
Itinerary
This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Pyramids of Giza, Al Haram Str., Giza 12611 Egypt

The last remaining wonder of the ancient world; for nearly 4000 years, the extraordinary shape, impeccable geometry and sheer bulk of the Giza Pyramids have invited the obvious questions: ‘How were we built, and why?’. Centuries of research have given us parts of the answer. Built as massive tombs on the orders of the pharaohs, they were constructed by teams of workers tens-of-thousands strong. Today they stand as an awe-inspiring tribute to the might, organisation and achievements of ancient Egypt.

Ongoing excavations on the Giza Plateau, along with the discovery of a pyramid-builders' settlement, complete with areas for large-scale food production and medical facilities, have provided more evidence that the workers were not the slaves of Hollywood tradition, but an organised workforce of Egyptian farmers. During the flood season, when the Nile covered their fields, the same farmers could have been redeployed by the highly structured bureaucracy to work on the pharaoh’s tomb. In this way, the Pyramids can almost be seen as an ancient job-creation scheme. And the flood waters made it easier to transport building stone to the site.

But despite the evidence, some still won’t accept that the ancient Egyptians were capable of such achievements. So-called pyramidologists point to the carving and placement of the stones, precise to the millimetre, and argue the numerological significance of the structures’ dimensions as evidence that the Pyramids were constructed by angels or aliens. It’s easy to laugh at these out-there ideas, but when you see the monuments up close, especially inside, you’ll better understand why so many people believe such awesome structures must have unearthly origins.

Most visitors will make a beeline straight to the four most famous sights; the Great Pyramid of Khufu, the Pyramid of Khafre, the Pyramid of Menkaure and the Sphinx. But for those who want to explore further, the desert plateau surrounding the pyramids is littered with tombs, temple ruins and smaller satellite pyramids.

Duration: 2 hours

Stop At: The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, Midan El Tahrir Geographical Society Building, Cairo 11511 Egypt

One of the world’s most important collections of ancient artefacts, the Egyptian Museum takes pride of place in Downtown Cairo, on the north side of Midan Tahrir. Inside the great domed, oddly pinkish building, the glittering treasures of Tutankhamun and other great pharaohs lie alongside the grave goods, mummies, jewellery, eating bowls and toys of Egyptians whose names are lost to history.

To walk around the museum is to embark on an adventure through time.

Some display cards have become obsolete as new discoveries have busted old theories. And the collection rapidly outgrew its sensible layout, as, for instance, Tutankhamun’s enormous trove and the tomb contents of Tanis were both unearthed after the museum opened, and then had to be shoehorned into the space. Now more than 100,000 objects are wedged into about 15,000 sq metres. Like the country itself, the museum is in flux. Most objects are still on display, although some are being moved to the Grand Egyptian Museum. While some rooms are being refurbished, the objects are deposited elsewhere in the museum. This museum will remain a major sight, but it is not yet clear when the Grand will open and what will remain here.

The current museum has its origins in several earlier efforts at managing Egypt’s ancient heritage, beginning in 1835 when Egyptian ruler Mohammed Ali banned the export of antiquities. French architect Mariette’s growing collection, from 35 dig sites, bounced around various homes in Cairo until 1902, when the current building was erected, in a suitably prominent position in the city. There it has stood, in its original layout, a gem of early museum design.

Until 1996, museum security involved locking the door at night. When an enterprising thief stowed away overnight and helped himself to treasures, the museum authorities installed alarms and detectors, at the same time improving the lighting on many exhibits. During the 2011 revolution, the museum was broken into and a few artefacts went missing. To prevent further looting, activists formed a human chain around the building to guard its contents. By most reports, they were successful.

Duration: 2 hours

Important Details

Included
  • Air-conditioned vehicle
  • Hotel pickup and drop-off
  • Professional guide
  • Lunch
  • Tour escort/host
  • Fuel surcharge
  • All taxes, fees and handling charges
  • Qualified Egyptologist guide
  • Entry/Admission - The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities
  • Entry/Admission - Pyramids of Giza
Not Included
  • DVD (available to purchase)
  • Souvenir photos (available to purchase)
  • Transfers outside Hurghada incur a 10 GBP per person surcharge
  • Gratuities
  • Food and drinks, unless specified
  • Drinks
Departure Point
Traveler pickup is offered
PLEASE NOTE THAT TRANSFERS ARE INCLUDED FROM HURGHADA HOTELS .

HOTELS OUTSIDE HURGHADA eg. SAHL HASHEESH, EL GOUNA, SOMA BAY, SAFAGA ETC WILL INCUR A 10GBP PP SURCHARGE PAYABLE ON THE DAY .

We also need copies of your passports before so we can get clearance from the government.

Also you must provide us with the room number at your hotel by maximum 7pm the day before the trip.

Failure to do this will result in up arranging your trip for the next available day.

2:00 AM
Additional Info
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • Wheelchair accessible
  • Children must be accompanied by an adult
  • This tour/activity will have a maximum of 35 travelers
Voucher Requirements

You can present either a paper or an electronic voucher for this activity.

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Cancellation Policy

All sales are final and incur 100% cancellation penalties.