Tours from safaga port for 2 days 1 night visiting Cairo & luxor

2 day

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Day Trip

Group Tour

Private tour 2 Days 1 night Available Upon Request at 6:00 am includes 1-night hotel accommodation in Luxor, all transfers by Private latest model A/C Bus, All Internal Flight Tickets, Sightseeing, Expert tour guide, the service of meet and assist at all your destinations., Entry fees, Tour guide, Camel Ride and Snacks and Refreshments, Tour excludes Visa Entry for Egypt, Personal items, Tipping and Any Optional tours.
Tours from safaga port for 2 days 1 night visiting Cairo & luxor photo 1 Tours from safaga port for 2 days 1 night visiting Cairo & luxor photo 2 Tours from safaga port for 2 days 1 night visiting Cairo & luxor photo 3 Tours from safaga port for 2 days 1 night visiting Cairo & luxor photo 4
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SPECIAL OFFER

Intro offer: Book by March 6 to save 20%.

Itinerary Details

Itinerary

Day 1: visit Giza pyramids

Stop At: Pyramids of Giza, Al Haram Str., Giza 12611 Egypt
The Great Pyramid of Giza (also known as the Pyramid of Khufu or the Pyramid of Cheops) is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering present-day Giza in Greater Cairo, Egypt. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to remain largely intact.

Based on a mark in an interior chamber naming the work gang and a reference to the Fourth Dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu, some Egyptologists believe that the pyramid was thus built as a tomb over a 10- to 20-year period concluding around 2560 BC. Initially standing at 146.5 metres (481 feet), the Great Pyramid was the tallest man-made structure in the world for more than 3,800 years until Lincoln Cathedral was finished in 1311 AD...
Itinerary

Day 1: visit Giza pyramids

Stop At: Pyramids of Giza, Al Haram Str., Giza 12611 Egypt
The Great Pyramid of Giza (also known as the Pyramid of Khufu or the Pyramid of Cheops) is the oldest and largest of the three pyramids in the Giza pyramid complex bordering present-day Giza in Greater Cairo, Egypt. It is the oldest of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one to remain largely intact.

Based on a mark in an interior chamber naming the work gang and a reference to the Fourth Dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu, some Egyptologists believe that the pyramid was thus built as a tomb over a 10- to 20-year period concluding around 2560 BC. Initially standing at 146.5 metres (481 feet), the Great Pyramid was the tallest man-made structure in the world for more than 3,800 years until Lincoln Cathedral was finished in 1311 AD. Originally, the Great Pyramid was covered by limestone casing stones that formed a smooth outer surface; what is seen today is the underlying core structure. Some of the casing stones that once covered the structure can still be seen around the base. There have been varying scientific and alternative theories about the Great Pyramid's construction techniques. Most accepted construction hypotheses are based on the idea that it was built by moving huge stones from a quarry and dragging and lifting them into place.

There are three known chambers inside the Great Pyramid. The lowest chamber is cut into the bedrock upon which the pyramid was built and was unfinished. The so-called[2] Queen's Chamber and King's Chamber are higher up within the pyramid structure. The main part of the Giza complex is a set of buildings that included two mortuary temples in honour of Khufu (one close to the pyramid and one near the Nile), three smaller pyramids for Khufu's wives, an even smaller "satellite" pyramid, a raised causeway connecting the two temples, and small mastaba tombs for nobles surrounding the pyramid.
Duration: 3 hours

Stop At: Great Sphinx, Al-Haram, Giza Egypt
The Great Sphinx of Giza, commonly referred to as the Sphinx of Giza or just the Sphinx, is a limestone statue of a reclining sphinx, a mythical creature with the body of a lion and the head of a human.[1] Facing directly from West to East, it stands on the Giza Plateau on the west bank of the Nile in Giza, Egypt. The face of the Sphinx is generally believed to represent the pharaoh Khafre.[2]

Cut from the bedrock, the original shape of the Sphinx has been restored with layers of blocks.[3] It measures 73 m (240 ft) long from paw to tail, 20 m (66 ft) high from the base to the top of the head and 19 m (62 ft) wide at its rear haunches.[4] It is the oldest known monumental sculpture in Egypt and is commonly believed to have been built by ancient Egyptians of the Old Kingdom during the reign of the pharaoh Khafre (c. 2558–2532 BC).[5]
Duration: 30 minutes

Meals included:
• Lunch
No accommodation included on this day.

Day 2: day tour visiting west bank in luxor

Stop At: Temple of Karnak, Karnak, Luxor Egypt
The Karnak Temple Complex, commonly known as Karnak (/ˈkɑːr.næk/,[1] from Arabic Khurnak meaning "fortified village"), comprises a vast mix of decayed temples, chapels, pylons, and other buildings near Luxor, in Egypt. Construction at the complex began during the reign of Senusret I in the Middle Kingdom (around 2000-1700 BC) and continued into the Ptolemaic period (305 - 30 BC), although most of the extant buildings date from the New Kingdom. The area around Karnak was the ancient Egyptian Ipet-isut ("The Most Selected of Places") and the main place of worship of the eighteenth dynasty Theban Triad with the god Amun as its head. It is part of the monumental city of Thebes. The Karnak complex gives its name to the nearby, and partly surrounded, modern village of El-Karnak, 2.5 kilometres (1.6 miles) north of Luxor.
Duration: 2 hours

Stop At: Temple of Hatshepsut, King Valley Road,, Luxor Egypt
Hatshepsut (/hætˈʃɛpsʊt/; also Hatchepsut; Egyptian: ḥꜣt-šps.wt "Foremost of Noble Ladies" 1507–1458 BC) was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. She was the second historically-confirmed female pharaoh, the first being Sobekneferu. (Various other women may have also ruled as pharaohs regnant or at least regents before Hatshepsut, as early as Neithhotep around 1600 years prior.)

Hatshepsut came to the throne of Egypt in 1478 BC. Her rise to power was noteworthy as it required her to utilize her bloodline, education, and an understanding of religion. Her bloodline was impeccable as she was the daughter, sister, and wife of a king. Her understanding of religion allowed her to establish herself as the God’s Wife of Amun. Officially, she ruled jointly with Thutmose III, who had ascended to the throne the previous year as a child of about two years old. Hatshepsut was the chief wife of Thutmose II, Thutmose III’s father. She is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty. According to Egyptologist James Henry Breasted, she is also known as "the first great woman in history of whom we are informed.
Duration: 2 hours

Stop At: Luxor Temple, Luxor 23512 Egypt
Luxor Temple (Arabic: معبد الاقصر) is a large Ancient Egyptian temple complex located on the east bank of the Nile River in the city today known as Luxor (ancient Thebes) and was constructed approximately 1400 BCE. In the Egyptian language it is known as ipet resyt, "the southern sanctuary". In Luxor there are several great temples on the east and west banks. Four of the major mortuary temples visited by early travelers include the Temple of Seti I at Gurnah, the Temple of Hatshepsut at Deir el Bahri, the Temple of Ramesses II (a.k.a. Ramesseum), and the Temple of Ramesses III at Medinet Habu; the two primary cults temples on the east bank are known as the Karnak and Luxor. Unlike the other temples in Thebes, Luxor temple is not dedicated to a cult god or a deified version of the pharaoh in death. Instead, Luxor temple is dedicated to the rejuvenation of kingship; it may have been where many of the pharaohs of Egypt were crowned in reality or conceptually (as in the case of Alexander the Great, who claimed he was crowned at Luxor but may never have traveled south of Memphis, near modern Cairo).

To the rear of the temple are chapels built by Amenhotep III of the 18th Dynasty, and Alexander. Other parts of the temple were built by Tutankhamun and Ramesses II. During the Roman era, the temple and its surroundings were a legionary fortress and the home of the Roman government in the area. During the Roman period a chapel inside the Luxor Temple originally dedicated to goddess Mut was transformed in to a Tetrarchy cult chapel and later into a church.
Duration: 2 hours

Meals included:
• Breakfast
No accommodation included on this day.

Important Details

Included
  • Water & snacks
  • Entry/Admission - Temple of Hatshepsut
  • 1 night hotel accommodation in Luxor on half board basis dinner and breakfast included.
  • Entry/Admission - Luxor Temple
  • Camel Ride at Giza Pyramids
  • 1x Lunch
  • Entry/Admission - Temple of Karnak
  • Entry/Admission - Great Sphinx
  • Entry Fees
  • Transfer from Luxor to Safaga Port by Private Latest model Bus
  • All Internal Flight Tickets from Hurghada to Cairo & From Cairo to Luxor
  • 1x Breakfast
  • Entry/Admission - Pyramids of Giza
Not Included
  • Any Optional tours Such as Visiting inside any of the pyramids and King`s Tutankamoun tomb
Departure Point
Traveler pickup is offered
As per requested time our tour guide will pickup you from port safaga with a sign showing your group name on then you will be transferred by Private A/C Bus to Hurghada airport where it`s 40 Minutes away from Safaga Port take your Flight to Cairo meet our tour guide

Airports

  • Cairo Intl Airport, Cairo Egypt


Ports

  • Safaga Port, Safaga, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt


8:00 AM
Additional Info
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • Not wheelchair accessible
  • Near public transportation
  • Most travelers can participate
  • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
Voucher Requirements

You can present either a paper or an electronic voucher for this activity.

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Cancellation Policy

For a full refund, cancel at least 48 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.