The Golden Triangle Tour | London-Oxford-Cambridge

3 day

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This tour takes you on a journey to the world's leading universities of the G5 in the United Kingdom and the English Language Standardization region. In the South of England, British cultural heritage, history has always and during your Golden Triangle Tour, you will see and visit many places of interest. You will see the places of interest in the list below in 3 different cities and it can be adapted to the group's specific...
This tour takes you on a journey to the world's leading universities of the G5 in the United Kingdom and the English Language Standardization region. In the South of England, British cultural heritage, history has always and during your Golden Triangle Tour, you will see and visit many places of interest. You will see the places of interest in the list below in 3 different cities and it can be adapted to the group's specific interests in London, Oxford and Cambridge.
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Itinerary Details

Itinerary

Day 1: London Landmarks and London Highlighs

Stop At: Parliament Square, Westminster, London SW1P 3BD England
Located right in the middle of London's iconic landmarks such as Houses of Parliament, Elizabeth Tower (a.k.a Big Ben), Whitehall, Saint-Margaret's Church, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge. Parliament Square houses eleven state figures and world leaders, including Sir Winston Churchill, Gandhi and Nelson Mandela. Parliament Square in London is a popular destination among tourists. The atmosphere is magnificent and it's one of the must-visit locations in the city.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: Houses of Parliament, Parliament Square, London SW1A 0AA England
The Houses of Parliament, known also as the Palace of Westminster is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings. The Houses of Parliament (Palace of Westminster) lie on the north bank of the River Thames...
Itinerary

Day 1: London Landmarks and London Highlighs

Stop At: Parliament Square, Westminster, London SW1P 3BD England
Located right in the middle of London's iconic landmarks such as Houses of Parliament, Elizabeth Tower (a.k.a Big Ben), Whitehall, Saint-Margaret's Church, Westminster Abbey and Westminster Bridge. Parliament Square houses eleven state figures and world leaders, including Sir Winston Churchill, Gandhi and Nelson Mandela. Parliament Square in London is a popular destination among tourists. The atmosphere is magnificent and it's one of the must-visit locations in the city.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: Houses of Parliament, Parliament Square, London SW1A 0AA England
The Houses of Parliament, known also as the Palace of Westminster is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings. The Houses of Parliament (Palace of Westminster) lie on the north bank of the River Thames in the London borough of the City of Westminster, close by other government buildings in Whitehall. The oldest part of the Houses of Parliament (Palace of Westminster) is still in existence, Westminster Hall, which dates from 1097.The palace originally served as a royal residence, but no monarch has lived in it since the 16th century. Most of the present Houses of Parliament (Palace of Westminster) structure dates from the 19th century, when the Palace was rebuilt after it was almost entirely destroyed by a fire in 1834. The architect responsible for rebuilding the Palace was Sir Charles Barry and Augustus Welby Pugin, and the building is an example of the Gothic revival.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: Westminster Abbey, 20 Dean's Yard Broad Sanctuary, London SW1P 3PA England
Westminster Abbey is a Church, burial ground, coronation site and much more, Westminster Abbey continues to attract visitors over 900 years after its founding. In many respects the architecture is common. There's the traditional cross-shaped floor plan with a nave, north and south transepts and several round side areas. But both its execution and use raise The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster (the official name) to among the highest examples of church construction. Here at Westminster Abbey lie buried kings and poets, scientists and philosophers who have themselves raised humankind to the highest levels. Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell (discoverer of electromagnetic theory, which later lead to radio and TV), Chaucer and Kipling, Dr. Samuel Johnson (creator of the first English dictionary) and many other justly famous names are interred here.
Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At: Buckingham Palace, Spur Road, London SW1A 1AA England
Buckingham Palace is still the official residence of Britain's monarchy, as it has been since Queen Victoria's designation in 1837. Much of the Buckingham Palace was constructed as early as 1703 for the Duke of Buckingham. Buckingham House (as it was then known) was purchased in 1762 by George III, who used it as a private residence. Over the following 75 years, the house was expanded to form three wings around a central courtyard. When Queen Victoria discovered Buckingham Palace lacked several 'necessary' rooms - such as a formal ballroom, a nursery, visitor's bedrooms and others - major additions were undertaken, including adding an entire wing to form a quadrangle. The Marble Arch was moved to Hyde Park, where it still resides near Speaker's Corner. With the refacing using Portland stone in 1913, the palace received its last major change. Buckingham Palace is still actively used as both residence and offices, over 50,000 guests and invited diplomats to visit per year who interact with over 400 individuals for whom this is 'the office'. Nevertheless, several parts of Buckingham Palace are open to the public.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Changing of the Guard, Constitution Hill Buckingham Palace, London SW1A 1AA England
The Queen's Guard and Queen's Life Guard (called King's Guard and King's Life Guard when the reigning monarch is male) are the names given to contingents of infantry and cavalry soldiers charged with guarding the official royal residences in the United Kingdom. The British Army has regiments of both Horse Guards and Foot Guards predating the English Restoration (1660), and since the reign of King Charles II these regiments have been responsible for guarding the Sovereign's palaces. Despite tourist perceptions, the Guards are not purely ceremonial and are fully operational soldiers.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: St. James's Park, Horse Guards Road The Storeyard, London SW1A 2BJ England
St. James's Park is one of the Royal Parks of London in the City of Westminster, London, just east of Buckingham Palace and west of Downing Street. For more than four hundred years, St James ' Park has been the centre of the royal and ceremonial life of the country. Many features of the park have been shaped by Royal ambitions and national events. We will show hidden gems and the best spots for your best photo shots in the park.
Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: Trafalgar Square, Centre of the City, London SW1A England
Trafalgar Square is London's iconic public square in the City of Westminster, Central London, built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross. Its name commemorates the Battle of Trafalgar, a British naval victory in the Napoleonic Wars over France and Spain that took place on 21 October 1805 off the coast of Cape Trafalgar. The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King's Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by architect John Nash, but progress was slow after his death, and the square did not open until 1844. The 169-foot (52 m) Nelson's Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square, but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999. The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations, including Bloody Sunday in 1887, the culmination of the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day. The square is a centre of annual celebrations on New Year's Eve but the London Eye obviously stole the thunder of Trafalgar Square since Millenium. It was well known for its feral pigeons until their removals in the early 21st century. Here we can observe the National Gallery, architect Sir James Gibbs's masterpiece St Martin in the Fields Church and National Portrait Gallery.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: Downing Street, London SW1A 2AL England
Being one of the most important political buildings in the world United Kingdom's White House Number 10 continuously hosts the British prime ministers since 1735. The main decisions affecting Britain's destiny in the last 275 years have seriously been taken behind its iconic black door. Today it's not possible to enter the street as a tourist but knowing the idea that an actual prime minister lives and works in the street is a heart beating. Have this experience with us.
Duration: 5 minutes

Stop At: Westminster Bridge, London England
Westminster Bridge is not an ordinary bridge to span the river Thames. It has a very tumultuous history in London. The bridge's colour is green and the story of the bridge is colourful. We will tell you about the history of the bridge after Lady Boudicca's role in London's 2000-year-old history. Before we leave, we will take some pictures of the London Eye, Royal Festival Hall and the River Thames.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: St. Paul's Cathedral, St Paul's Churchyard, London EC4M 8AD England
St Paul's Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The present building dates from the 17th century and is generally reckoned to be London's fourth St Pauls Cathedral, although the number is higher if every major medieval reconstruction is counted as a new cathedral. The first cathedral was built by the Saxons in wood. It burned down in AD 675 and was rebuilt, again in wood, ten years later. After this version was sacked by the Vikings in 962, the "second" St Pauls was built, this time mainly in stone. The predecessor to Wren's cathedral,The third St Pauls (known as Old St Pauls), was begun by the Normans after the late Saxon cathedral suffered in a fire of 1087. Work took over two hundred years, and a great deal was lost in a fire in 1136. Nonetheless, the roof was once more built of wood, which was ultimately to doom the building. St Paul is the symbol of a nation's resistance. We have plenty of stories to tell about Sir Christopher's masterpiece in the heart of London.
Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At: The Monument to the Great Fire of London, Monument St., London EC3R 8AH England
The Monument to the Great Fire of London, more commonly known simply as the Monument, is a Doric column in London, United Kingdom, situated near the northern end of London Bridge. Commemorating the Great Fire of London, it stands at the junction of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill, 202 feet (62 m) in height and 202 feet west of the spot in Pudding Lane where the Great Fire started on 2 September 1666. Constructed between 1671 and 1677, it was built on the site of St. Margaret's, Fish Street, the first church to be destroyed by the Great Fire. The Monument comprises a fluted Doric column built of Portland stone topped with a gilded urn of fire. It was designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke. Its height marks its distance from the site of the shop of Thomas Farriner (or Farynor), the king's baker, where the blaze began. Hear the story of how London missed its opportunity to be a highly planned city of all times.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: 60 London Wall, London EC2M 5TQ England
The London Wall was the defensive wall first built by the Romans around Londinium in 250 AD, their strategically important port town on the River Thames in what is now London, England, and subsequently maintained until the 18th century. It is now the name of a road in the City of London running along part of the course of the old wall in Tower Hill. Until the later Middle Ages, the wall defined the boundaries of the City of London. Let's see and explore this masterpiece of Roman engineering.
Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At: Tower of London, St Katharine's & Wapping, London EC3N 4AB England
Few prisons can claim to be as popular as the Tower of London, an attraction - unpleasant for some - for over 900 years. Its twenty towers are filled with an ancient tradition of royal blood, armor and jewels and the history to match. The Tower of London central structure began as a fort - used by the original builder William the Conqueror who completed the first tower around 1100 AD. At its completion it was the tallest building in London. Henry III had it whitewashed in the 13th century and the name, White Tower, has stuck. Later it evolved into a prison, used by Henry VII (and many others). Still later - and continuing to this day - it has acted as a repository for the extensive collection of crown jewels. Henry VII, nearly always short of money, had few jewels to store. But the stone complex, near the Tower Bridge alongside the River Thames, has also been used at various times to house the Royal Mint, the Public Records, the Royal Menagerie (later to form the starting point of the London Zoo) and an observatory (built in 1675). Listen to the rest of the story of the Tower of London from us today.
Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Tower Bridge Road, London SE1 2UP England
Tower Bridge is probably city's most distinctive symbol for today. Bridge shows a lot to its medieval predecessor London Bridge with its starlings and elaborate twin towers that give the bridge its name but it's not just a homage to the past, hidden inside that medieval looking exterior there's a rather wonderful piece of Victorian engineering and in its day it was the biggest and most sophisticated lifting bridge in the world. Unlike London Bridge, the genius of the design is that the bridge can act as a gateway swinging open to allow tall ships to pass through. Plenty of things we will tell you about this masterpiece in London, just follow us!
Duration: 15 minutes

No meals included on this day.
Accommodation included: After London, we will head to Oxford and in the dusk, we will check in our farmhouse style boutique hotel in Oxford.

Day 2: Oxford Landmarks and Oxford Highlighs

Stop At: Christ Church, St. Aldates, Oxford OX1 1DP England
Christ Church is one of the famous colleges in Oxford. The School of British Prime Ministers of all times was founded by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal and statesman of Henry VIII. The Chapel of the College is doubled as the Cathedral of the city. The Grand Hall of the Harry Potter was filmed in three different spots. On the walls there are portraits of alumni–Prime Ministers, churchmen and philosophers; and Alice in Wonderland writer Lewis Carroll was teaching at the university. Christ Church has a number of architecturally significant buildings including Tom Tower (proudly designed by Sir Christopher Wren an Oxford professor, architect, inventor, astronomer and physicist) Tom Quad (the largest quadrangle in Oxford), and the Great Dining Hall which was also the seat of the parliament assembled by King Charles I during the English Civil War. Our APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides will tell you all interesting stories about Christ Church.
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Alice’s Shop, 83 St. Aldates, Oxford OX1 1RA England
Yes, Alice is in Wonderland is real. In the Victorian era, its customers included Alice Liddell, daughter of Henry Liddell, who was Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, which is opposite the shop. Alice, who used to buy sweets at the shop, was the inspiration for Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass. We are talking about one of the most famous little shops in the world is right up there, just across the road from Christ Church College. The Alice’s Shop in Oxford is world-famous because the shop itself was written into the Alice adventures over 150 years ago. The small shop was dubbed “Alice’s Shop” locally as soon as the stories became well known, even as it continued as a grocery and sweet shop. Since the mid-60s, the shop began to sell Alice in Wonderland souvenirs. The Shop is now a treasure trove of Alice in Wonderland themed gifts, souvenirs and memorabilia. Alice’s Shop is one of the most tangible links to an entire episode in the Alice in Wonderland adventures and offers lovers of the stories a moment of intimate connection with the World of Alice as well as an insight into Carroll’s creation. The story is as sweet as candies in the store. Want shopping?

Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At: Carfax Tower, Corner of Carfax and Cornmarket, Oxford OX1 England
The name "Carfax" derives from the Latin quadrifurcus via the French carrefour, both of which mean "crossroads". The tower is located in the centre of Oxford's shopping area since the medieval times. This 6 bells tower is all that remains of the 14th-century Church of St Martin. The Carfax Tower, also known as St. Martin's Tower (it is the remaining part of what was the City Church of St. Martin of Tours) is a prominent landmark and provides a look-out over the town. the Mayor and Corporation were expected to worship, between about 1122 and 1896, when the main part of the church was demolished to make more room for road traffic. In 1896 the City Church was moved to All Saints Church in the High Street. The tower is 74 feet (23 m) tall, and no building in central Oxford may be built higher than it.
Duration: 5 minutes

Stop At: Oxford Covered Market, Market Street, Oxford OX1 3DZ England
Oxford Covered Market features more than 50 traders selling fresh produce, gifts, fashion, flowers and jewellery, and provides a unique showcase for the very best in local crafts, food and drink. The majority of the businesses are independent and with some going back generations. Oxford Covered Market, which was designed by Magdalen Bridge architect John Gwynn, first opened as a market for meat, fish, vegetables and herbs on 1 November 1774. It was then enlarged several times, rebuilt and fully roofed over during the 19th century. Original iron roof supports can easily be seen even today. Iron bars projecting from shop fronts that date from the 19th century and were used to hang meat. The Covered Market has been in continual use as a market for almost 250 years. Fancy a cup of traditional English tea with homemade cookies in this charming atmosphere? Just follow Tourope UK's APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides.
Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At: Radcliffe Camera, Radcliffe Square, Oxford OX1 4AJ England
English Palladium Style with its stylish Cotswold stone, Radcliffe Camera is completed in 1737, this domed classical building forms the hub of architectural Oxford and is considered one of England's earliest examples of around library. Funded by Dr John Radcliffe, designed by James Gibbs and built between 1737–48, this grand circular building in the middle of Radcliffe Square is an iconic landmark in Oxford and a working library. The domed classical building is considered to be one of England's earliest examples of around the library. This lovely masterpiece is actually a gift from Dr Radcliffe showing his appreciation to the town where he became famous.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: Bodleian Library Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BG England
The Bodleian Library is a working library which forms part of the University of Oxford. It is housed in a remarkable group of buildings which forms the historic heart of the University, and you can explore the quadrangles of these magnificent structures at no charge. Some of the buildings, such as the University’s oldest teaching and examination room, The Divinity School (built 1427-88). Here you will discover more of the University’s fascinating history by Tourope UK's APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides telling behind the scenes in the Library, including its oldest research library, dating from 1602-20. You will marvel at 5 basic orders of the architecture of columns such as Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Tucson and Composite.
Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: Bridge of Sighs, New College Ln., Oxford OX1 3BL England
The main buildings at Hertford College are linked together by a corridor called the "Bridge of Sighs," built-in 1913-14 and named after the Ponte Dei Sospiri in Venice. The Bridge of Sighs lies right opposite the entrance to the Bodleian Library, famous for its similarity to the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, has never intended to be a replica of the Venetian bridge, and instead, it bears a closer resemblance to the Rialto Bridge in the same city. Nevertheless, the bridge provides a popular photo opportunity for tourists and newcomers. Just pay attention to our guide why we call the bridge as "Bridge of Sighs"
Duration: 5 minutes

Stop At: Clarendon Building, Broad St., Oxford OX1 3BA England
Built-in 1712 by the Oxford University Press for the University's printing, the building is now part of the Bodleian Library. It was built to house the Oxford University Press, which had previously been occupying a large room over the ceiling of the Sheldonian Theatre. It owes it name to the fact that it was partly paid for by the profits from the History of the Great Rebellion by Lord Clarendon, whose son presented the University with its copyright. It was known as “The Printing House” until the University Press moved to Walton Street in 1832. Today the building is used as an international exam centre.
Duration: 5 minutes

Stop At: Sheldonian Theatre, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3AZ England
The Sheldonian Theatre, an exquisite Grade I listed building situated in Oxford's city centre, is the official ceremonial hall of Oxford University. The Theatre is a popular tourist attraction particular because it offers one of the best indoor panoramic views of Oxford's famous skyline from its Cupola. It was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and built between 1664 and 1669. Learn about how the University was formed, how long it's been in existence and the secrets of its past by Tourope UK's APTG qualified blue badge tourist guides. Next to the Sheldonian Theatre, we will also visit Divinity School. You will be amazed at the Divinity School’s intricate ceiling patterns and gorgeous tall windows. On your visit make sure to take a sit on a bench and imagine oral exams taking places within those magnificent walls. The Divinity School is a medieval building and room in the Perpendicular style characterised by its rich ornamentation and tracery. The building, which belongs to the University of Oxford, is attached to the Bodleian Library. Designed between 1423 and 1488 specifically for lectures, oral exams and discussions on theology, was almost ‘certainly the building that popularised Tudor arches’. The building was also used during the very first series of the Harry Potter movie.
Duration: 5 minutes

Meals included:
• Breakfast
Accommodation included: Time to head to Cambridge and upon arrival, we will check in our farmhouse style boutique hotel in Cambridge.

Day 3: Cambridge Landmarks and Cambridge Highlighs

Stop At: Scudamore's Quayside Punt Hire, Quayside Punting Station, Magdalene St, Cambridge CB5 8AB, UK
What could it be better than gliding slowly along the river which takes you right in the middle of the medieval architecture, the backyards of the world’s famous colleges, green lawns and famous the Bridge of Sighs? Now that you’re in Cambridge, this is one of the must-do activities in this lovely city. Meet with local punting guys that will take you to this tranquil journey. You won’t be alone. You will be accompanied by the swans and ducks along the river. Your journey will take approximately 45 minutes.
Duration: 45 minutes

Pass By: Mathematical Bridge, Queens' College, Cambridge CB3 9ET England
The Mathematical Bridge is the popular name of a wooden footbridge in the southwest of central Cambridge. It bridges the River Cam about one hundred feet northwest of Silver Street Bridge and connects two parts of Queens' College. Local legend says Isaac Newton built this footbridge without any screws, bolts, or nails. You will view the bridge for free from the nearby bridge on Silver Street. In fact, our guided punting tour will take you underneath the bridge and you will have the chance to take as many as pictures you like. It not the original wooden and timber structure at all. First built in 1749 it appears to be an arch yet is composed entirely of straight timbers to sophisticated engineering design.

Stop At: King's College, King's Parade, Cambridge CB2 1ST England
King's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge. Formally The King's College of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas in Cambridge, the college faces out onto King's Parade in the centre of the city with its splendid grounds and buildings stretching to the River Cam and beyond. Dating from the mid-15th century and one of the finest examples of medieval architect, this college’s main draw is its chapel that houses Rubens’ Adoration of the Magi. College stands in the centre of Cambridge City. Listen to the story of the King’s College starting with Henry VI in 1446 and goes with the very first Tudor king Henry VII and his famous son Henry VIII up to 1544. Learn how College is disrupted by the Wars of the Roses.
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: St. John's College, St. John's St., Cambridge CB2 1TP England
St John’s College is another masterpiece of the Lancastrian architecture in Cambridge. The college was founded in 1511 from the estate of Lady Margaret Beaufort, mother of King Henry VII who is also the father of our famous King Henry VIII. This Cambridge college boasts a gatehouse whose exterior is beautifully carved and painted. Here in this college, we will marvel at Tudor quadrangle that leads to gorgeous chapel. Through a walk in the second quadrangle, an impressive Old Library will greet us. Old Library will full of treasures such as Caxton’s very first printed book, Margaret Beaufort’s book of hours and enormous antiphonal. And like every College in Cambridge, you will admire the large and walled gardens of St John’s College. During our visit, your guide will mention the deep-seated history of British monarchs especially by focusing the Yorkists as well as The Lancastrians who have been at daggers with each other.
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Market Square, Market Street, Cambridge CB2 3QJ England
This cosy market names its city as “A market City”. Since the middle ages, all stalls have constantly been trading in historic district of Cambridge, market square where you can find wide range of goods including street foods, books, vinyl, CD’s, DVD’s, vintage clothes, beads, crocheted and knitted items, jewellery, antiquity, fruits, vegetables, olives, freshly prepared products such as breads, cakes, cookies, scones, healthy foods, meat products, fish and dairy products, any type of second-hand goods including bikes, garden plans, flowers, electronic gadgets, mobile phone accessories, typical English art and craft stands, hand made things, yarns, embellishments, totes, bags, suitcases, simply beyond your imagination. The market square also offers a flourishing local food, arts and crafts market on Sundays selling organic produce from local farmers and work from some of the region's most talented artists, craftsmen, potters, sculptors and photographers. To feel the soul of this vibrant city, historic Market Square would the best hit in Cambridge.
Duration: 45 minutes

Stop At: Great St Mary's Church (Church of England), St. Marys Passage King's Parade, Cambridge CB2 3PQ England
Overlooking the marketplace in the centre of Cambridge, this beautiful church dates to 1205 - even older than the University of Cambridge. Great St Mary's was built, rebuilt, burned and built again over the centuries. The current building is largely Tudor. King Henry VII donated 100 oak trees to build its roof and Queen Elizabeth I visited the church in 1564 and gave an impressive Latin speech to the assembled scholars. Interactive touchscreens and a short film about royal Cambridge offer a perfect introduction to the history of Cambridge. Visitors can climb the tower for stunning views of King's College Chapel and the city. Great St Mary’s Church also offers brass rubbing and children's activities during busier times of the year. Great St Mary's is the church at the heart of Cambridge and hosts regular services, concerts, debates and community events in Cambridge. Here in this shrine, our qualified APTG guides will tell you all about Tudors and the milestones of the English and Scottish history.
Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Trumpington Street Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge CB2 1RB England
The Fitzwilliam Museum is literally the British Museum of Cambridge. It’s the art - antiquities museum of the University of Cambridge and a must-see attraction in Cambridge. This lovely museum houses vast collections of antiquities from ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, including exhibits of English and European pottery and glass, furniture, clocks, Chinese jades, and ceramics from Japan and Korea. From antiquity to the present day, the Fitzwilliam houses a world-renowned collection of over halves a million beautiful works of art, masterpiece paintings and historical artefacts. This museum gives us an opportunity to mention worlds and British history and culture under the same roof. The museum's history doesn't go very far. In 1816, Richard, VII Viscount Fitzwilliam of Merrion bequeathed his works of art and library to the University of Cambridge and today, we, the culture hunters thank for him for this lovely art and culture shrine.
Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Meals included:
• Breakfast
No accommodation included on this day.

Important Details

Included
  • Air-conditioned vehicle
  • Private transportation
  • 2x Breakfast
  • Entry/Admission - Scudamore's Quayside Punt Hire
  • All Fees and Taxes
  • Accommodation included: 2 nights
Not Included
  • Entry/Admission - Tower Bridge
  • Entry/Admission - Radcliffe Camera
  • Entry/Admission - Buckingham Palace
  • Entry/Admission - The Monument to the Great Fire of London
  • Entry/Admission - Great St Mary's Church (Church of England)
  • Entry/Admission - St. John's College
  • Entry/Admission - Carfax Tower
  • Entry/Admission - King's College
  • Entry/Admission - Tower of London
  • Entry/Admission - Christ Church
  • Entry/Admission - St. Paul's Cathedral
  • Lunches and Dinners
  • Entry/Admission - Bodleian Library
Departure Point
1: Parliament Square, Westminster, London SW1P, UK
2: Coca-Cola London Eye, South Bank, London SE1 7PB, UK

Traveler pickup is offered
Please be ready and waiting in your hotel lobby 15 minutes prior to your scheduled pick-up time and let the lobby that you are expecting a tour guide. If you will be picked up from the airport, your guide will meet you in the arrival hall of the airport accordingly.

Airports

  • Heathrow Airport, Hounslow TW6 England
  • London Stansted Airport, Bassingbourn Rd, Stansted CM24 1QW, UK
  • Gatwick Airport, Horley RH6 0NP England


Return Details
Returns to original departure point
Additional Info
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • Wheelchair accessible
  • Stroller accessible
  • Service animals allowed
  • Infants must sit on laps
  • Infant seats available
  • Transportation is wheelchair accessible
  • Surfaces are wheelchair accessible
  • Travelers should have a moderate physical fitness level
  • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
Voucher Requirements

You can present either a paper or an electronic voucher for this activity.

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Cancellation Policy

If you cancel at least 4 day(s) in advance of the scheduled departure, there is no cancellation fee.If you cancel within 3 day(s) of the scheduled departure, there is a 100 percent cancellation fee.