The History of Black Georgetown

6 Ratings
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* This tour is generally offered every other Friday at 11am, and every other Sunday at 1pm. Someone visiting Georgetown today may see it as another wealthy enclave in a continuously gentrifying Washington, DC. However, this charming area that boasts high-end shopping and gourmet restaurants has a diverse history. Originally a busy port for the export of tobacco, it was also the site of an active slave trade, and at one point African Americans counted as 30% of the Georgetown population. Descendants of those enslaved peoples and black free folk have lived in Georgetown for generations, but their contributions to its history do not often receive the same recognition. This tour will reveal the stories of the black citizens who made their mark on one of DC’s oldest neighborhoods. The tour starts at 3206 O Street NW DC and ends at the Mt. Zion Cemetery, at 2501 Mill Rd. NW. There is a half-way stop at Thomas Sweet Shop for a batheroom break and refreshment.

Itinerary Details

This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Georgetown University

The gothic-style Healy Hall was built at the direction of, and named for, Georgetown University's only black President, Patrick Healy.

Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At:

Pomander Walk used to be Bell's Court, owned by Alexander Graham Bell. Bell's Court was characteristic of alleyway communities throughout DC, where you had a close-knit black community.

Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At:

This address was the former property of prominent black Georgetown resident Yarrow Mamout, in the early 19th century.

Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At:

The tour takes a half-way stop at Thomas Sweet for refreshment and a bathroom break.

Duration: 15 minutes

Stop At:

The row houses at this address used to serve as holding pens for the enslaved. The pens were torn down by an Irish entrepreneur who had themselves spent their childhood as an indentured servant in the West Indies.

Duration: 10 minutes

Pass By:

The house of Emma Brown, who was one of the first black teachers in DC to reach the level of Principal.

Stop At:

The Mount Zion United Methodist Church is one of the oldest black congregations in Georgetown.

Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At:

This historic park was the site of numerous political rallies and community gatherings for the black community in Georgetown.

Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At:

This is the oldest cemetery in Georgetown, which contains the remains of enslaved and free black citizens.

Duration: 10 minutes
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