7-hour Tokyo tour, with Private Car, from/to Yokohama

8 hr

E-Ticket

Day Trip

Pickup Service

Group Tour

We offer you several selling points other travel companies could never do.

Effective : Because the guide and driver is same person. On top of it, he plays
Photographer's roll.
Comfortable : Because the cars we use are spacious and luxury.
Exciting : Because you will savor a local food like they would do.
Flexible : Because the schedule is up to you. This is full-private tour for you.
Inquisitive : Because you will learn...
We offer you several selling points other travel companies could never do.

Effective : Because the guide and driver is same person. On top of it, he plays
Photographer's roll.
Comfortable : Because the cars we use are spacious and luxury.
Exciting : Because you will savor a local food like they would do.
Flexible : Because the schedule is up to you. This is full-private tour for you.
Inquisitive : Because you will learn a lots of Japanese History.
7-hour Tokyo tour, with Private Car, from/to Yokohama photo 1 7-hour Tokyo tour, with Private Car, from/to Yokohama photo 2 7-hour Tokyo tour, with Private Car, from/to Yokohama photo 3 7-hour Tokyo tour, with Private Car, from/to Yokohama photo 4
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Itinerary Details

Itinerary
This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Senso-ji Temple, 2-3-1 Asakusa, Taito 111-0032 Tokyo Prefecture

Sensoji (浅草寺, Sensōji, also known as Asakusa Kannon Temple) is a Buddhist temple located in Asakusa. It is one of Tokyo’s most colorful and popular temples. The legend says that in the year 628, two brothers fished a statue of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, out of the Sumida River, and even though they put the statue back into the river, it always returned to them. Consequently, Sensoji was built nearby for the goddess of Kannon. The temple was completed in 645, making it Tokyo’s oldest temple. Main Hall : When approaching the temple, visitors first enter through the Kaminarimon(Thunder Gate), the outer gate of Sensoji Temple and the symbol of Asakusa and the entire city of Tokyo. A shopping street of over 200 meters, called Nakamise, leads from the outer...
Itinerary
This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Senso-ji Temple, 2-3-1 Asakusa, Taito 111-0032 Tokyo Prefecture

Sensoji (浅草寺, Sensōji, also known as Asakusa Kannon Temple) is a Buddhist temple located in Asakusa. It is one of Tokyo’s most colorful and popular temples. The legend says that in the year 628, two brothers fished a statue of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, out of the Sumida River, and even though they put the statue back into the river, it always returned to them. Consequently, Sensoji was built nearby for the goddess of Kannon. The temple was completed in 645, making it Tokyo’s oldest temple. Main Hall : When approaching the temple, visitors first enter through the Kaminarimon(Thunder Gate), the outer gate of Sensoji Temple and the symbol of Asakusa and the entire city of Tokyo. A shopping street of over 200 meters, called Nakamise, leads from the outer gate to the temple's second gate, the Hozomon. Alongside typical Japanese souvenirs such as yukata and folding fans, various traditional local snacks from the Asakusa area are sold along the Nakamise. The shopping street has a history of several centuries. View of the Nakamise from above ; Beyond the Hozomon Gate stands the temple’s main hall and a five storied pagoda. Destroyed in the war, the buildings are relatively recent reconstructions. The Asakusa Shrine, built in the year 1649 by Tokugawa Iemitsu, the Third Shogun, stands only a few dozen meters to the left of the temple's main building.

Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Stop At: Meiji Jingu Shrine, 1-1 Yoyogikamizonocho, Shibuya 151-0052 Tokyo Prefecture

Meiji Shrine (明治神宮, Meiji Jingū) is a shrine dedicated to the deified spirits of Emperor Meiji and his consort, Empress Shoken. Located just beside the JR Yamanote Line's busy Harajuku Station, Meiji Shrine and the adjacent Yoyogi Park make up a large forested area within the densely built-up city. The spacious shrine grounds offer walking paths that are great for a relaxing stroll. The shrine was completed and dedicated to the Emperor Meiji and the Empress Shoken in 1920, eight years after the passing of the emperor and six years after the passing of the empress. The shrine was destroyed during the Second World War but was rebuilt shortly thereafter. Emperor Meiji was the first emperor of modern Japan. He was born in 1852 and ascended to the throne in 1867 at the peak of the Meiji Restoration when Japan's feudal era came to an end and the emperor was restored to power. During the Meiji Period, Japan modernized and westernized herself to join the world's major powers by the time Emperor Meiji passed away in 1912.
The main complex of shrine buildings is located a ten minute walk from both the southern entrance near Harajuku Station and the northern entrance near Yoyogi Station. Entry into the shrine grounds is marked by a massive torii gate, after which the sights and sounds of the busy city are replaced by a tranquil forest. The approximately 100,000 trees that make up Meiji Jingu's forest were planted during the shrine's construction and were donated from regions across the entire country. At the middle of the forest, Meiji Jingu's buildings also have an air of tranquility distinct from the surrounding city. Visitors to the shrine can take part in typical Shinto activities, such as making offerings at the main hall, buying charms and amulets or writing out one's wish on an ema. Meiji Jingu is one of Japan's most popular shrines. In the first days of the New Year, the shrine regularly welcomes more than three million visitors for the year's first prayers (hatsumode), more than any other shrine or temple in the country. During the rest of the year, traditional Shinto weddings can often be seen taking place there.

Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Shibuya Crossing, Shibuya 150-8010 Tokyo Prefecture

Shibuya (渋谷) is one of the twenty-three city wards of Tokyo, but often refers to just the popular shopping and entertainment area found around Shibuya Station. In this regard, Shibuya is one of Tokyo's most colorful and busy districts, packed with shopping, dining and nightclubs serving swarms of visitors that come to the district everyday. Shibuya is a center for youth fashion and culture, and its streets are the birthplace to many of Japan's fashion and entertainment trends. Over a dozen major department store branches can be found around the area catering to all types of shoppers. Most of the area's large department and fashion stores belong to either Tokyu or Seibu, two competing corporations. A prominent landmark of Shibuya is the large intersection in front of the station's Hachiko Exit. The intersection is heavily decorated by neon advertisements and giant video screens and gets flooded by pedestrians each time the crossing light turns green, making it a popular photo spot. Shibuya Station and surroundings are currently undergoing major redevelopment, lasting almost two decades. Several new buildings have opened over recent years, including Shibuya Hikarie (in 2012), Shibuya Stream (2018) and Shibuya Scrumble Street (2019), and more will be opening until works are completed around 2028. In addition, the flow of pedestrian traffic around the station will be greatly improved.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Imperial Palace, 1-1 Chiyoda, Chiyoda 100-8111 Tokyo Prefecture

The current Imperial Palace (皇居, Kōkyo) is located on the former site of Edo Castle, a large park area surrounded by moats and massive stone walls in the center of Tkyo, a short walk from Tokyo Station. It is the residence of Japan's Imperial Family.Edo Castle used to be the seat of the Tokugawa Shogun who ruled Japan from 1603 until 1867. In 1868, the shogunate was overthrown, and the country's capital and Imperial Residence were moved from Kyoto to Tokyo. In 1888 construction of a new Imperial Palace was completed. The palace was once destroyed during World War Two, and rebuilt in the same style, afterwards. From Kokyo Gaien, the large plaza in front of the Imperial Palace, visitors can view the Nijubashi, two bridges that form an entrance to the inner palace grounds. The stone bridge in front is called Meganebashi (Eyeglass Bridge) for its looks. The bridge in the back was formerly a wooden bridge with two levels, from which the name Nijubashi (Double Bridge) is derived. The inner grounds of the palace are generally not open to the public. Only on January 2 (New Year's Greeting) and February 23 (Emperor’s Birthday), visitors are able to enter the inner palace grounds and see the members of the Imperial Family , who make several public appearances on a balcony.

Duration: 1 hour 30 minutes

Stop At: Takeshita Street, 1, Jingumae, Shibuya 150-0001 Tokyo Prefecture

Shibuya (渋谷) is one of the twenty-three city wards of Tokyo, but often refers to just the popular shopping and entertainment area found around Shibuya Station. In this regard, Shibuya is one of Tokyo's most colorful and busy districts, packed with shopping, dining and nightclubs serving swarms of visitors that come to the district everyday. Shibuya is a center for youth fashion and culture, and its streets are the birthplace to many of Japan's fashion and entertainment trends. Over a dozen major department store branches can be found around the area catering to all types of shoppers. Most of the area's large department and fashion stores belong to either Tokyu or Seibu, two competing corporations. A prominent landmark of Shibuya is the large intersection in front of the station's Hachiko Exit. The intersection is heavily decorated by neon advertisements and giant video screens and gets flooded by pedestrians each time the crossing light turns green, making it a popular photo spot. Shibuya Station and surroundings are currently undergoing major redevelopment, lasting almost two decades. Several new buildings have opened over recent years, including Shibuya Hikarie (in 2012), Shibuya Stream (2018) and Shibuya Scrumble Street (2019), and more will be opening until works are completed around 2028. In addition, the flow of pedestrian traffic around the station will be greatly improved.

Duration: 45 minutes

Stop At: Tsukiji Jogai Market, 4-16-2 Tsukiji, Chuo 104-0045 Tokyo Prefecture

The wholesale market of Tsukiji Market, which was also known as the "inner market" and was famous for its tuna auctions, closed on October 6, 2018 and moved to a new site in Toyosu where it reopened as Toyosu Market. Tsukiji's outer market with its many shops and restaurants, on the other hand, did not close and remains in business. Tsukiji Outer Market (築地場外市場, Tsukiji Jōgai Shijō) is a district adjacent to the site of the former Tsukiji Wholesale Market. It consists of a few blocks of wholseale and retail shops, as well as restaurant crowded along narrow lanes. Here you can find fresh and processed seafood and produce alongside food-related goods such as knives. A visit to Tsukiji Outer Market is best combined with a fresh sushi breakfast or lunch at one of the local restaurants. The restaurants are typically open from 5:00 in the morning to around noon or early afternoon. Because most of the fish served and sold at Tsukiji Outer Market is delivered directly from Toyosu Market, this is one of the best places in Tokyo to enjoy fresh seafood.

Duration: 1 hour

Pass By: Ginza, Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo, Tokyo Prefecture, Kanto

Ginza is the name of a district in central Tokyo. It is a vibrant shopping area with large department stores and several famous brands. The name “Ginza” originates from the names of organizations that purchased and controlled the silver coin established by the Edo Shogunate (1603-1868). At the time, organizations that dealt with specific commerce and industries were called “za,” or trade guilds. The office and silver coin foundry of an organization called Ginza was once located in the neighborhood's Nichome area. This district of Tokyo is now thriving as a business and shopping area. Cultural facilities such as the Kabukiza Theater are als located in Ginza, making it an attractive destination for travelers. We introduce the best places to visit in Ginza - for sightseeing and shopping.

Pass By: Akihabara, Taito City, Tokyo, Japan

Akihabara, often shortened to "Akiba," is an area in eastern Tokyo that is the undisputed electronics and camera capital of Japan. The few blocks around Akihabara Station are a mass of shops selling the full range of electronic and electric goods, computer games, and home appliances, from brand new audiophile, ultra high-end to second-hand bargain bin. As well as for the cameras, computers, TVs and mobile phones, Akihabara is also a treasure trove of manga, games, toys, anime, and amine DVD videos, as well as its famous maid cafes. Akihabara attracts hordes of those fascinated by anime and manga culture: the otaku, or, nerds. Most Akihabara shopping includes a tax free service for tourists.

Important Details

Included
  • Air-conditioned vehicle
  • Private transportation
  • Transportation expenses like car charter, fuel, tolls, and parking.
  • WiFi on board
  • Guide Fee
Not Included
  • Lunch and beverages, we are glad to find a fine restaurant on your request.
  • Admission or entrance fee. Hamarikyu Park : adult¥300/child free
Departure Point
Traveler pickup is offered
The pickup point is all area of Yokohama City.
Hotel Pickup is OK.
Cruise Port Pickup is OK (Osambashi Port. Daikokufuto Port)
Yokohama Station Pickup is OK.

The duration of the tour is 7-hour out of 08:00am.-10:00pm. The start time is up to you and the cruise ship.

"Remarks"
Pickup point and drop off point are same place in Yokohama basically. If you would like to be sent to Narita or Haneda Airport, we have another plan. Please refer to it.

Ports

  • Osanbashi Port, Daikoku-Futo Port, and Yamashita Port in Yokohama


Mini&Jumbo-Van for 1~8pax 4/26/2019 - 3/1/2020
Monday:07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Tuesday:07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Wednesday:07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Thursday:10:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Friday:07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Saturday:07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Sunday:10:00 AM - 10:00 PM
3/2/2020 - 3/20/2021
Monday - Sunday:07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Mini Bus for 9~13 pax 1/10/2020 - 3/20/2021
Monday - Sunday:07:00 AM - 10:00 PM
Additional Info
  • Confirmation will be received within 48 hours of booking, subject to availability
  • Infant seats available
  • Service animals allowed
  • Near public transportation
  • Stroller accessible
  • Surfaces are wheelchair accessible
  • Transportation is wheelchair accessible
  • Wheelchair accessible
  • Please give us a message if you need a child seat.
  • Most travelers can participate
  • This experience requires good weather. If it’s canceled due to poor weather, you’ll be offered a different date or a full refund
  • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
Voucher Requirements

You can present either a paper or an electronic voucher for this activity.

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Cancellation Policy

For a full refund, cancel at least 48 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.